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Kauffman-Hallahan-Pullen Distinguished Researcher Award

In recognition of the critical importance of research in special education that has a meaningful impact on the field, the CEC-DR seeks nominations for the Kauffman-Hallahan-Pullen Distinguished Researcher Award. This award recognizes individuals or research teams whose research has resulted in more effective services or education for exceptional individuals. Recipients of this award are recognized for both the creation of a research base and the work done to translate this research into practice. Thus, the recognized work may include, but is not limited to, research articles, paper series, monographs, professional development activities, book chapters, and/or books. The Kauffman-Hallahan-Pullen Distinguished Researcher Award is funded through earnings of the Handbook of Special Education, edited by James Kauffman, Daniel Hallahan, and Paige Pullen and published by Routledge. The award, co-sponsored by Routledge Press, includes $1,000 presented at the DR Reception at the CEC Annual Convention. Nominations are sought across all areas of Special Education as well as all forms of research methodology. Previous recipients include Hill Walker, Lynn and Doug Fuchs, Mary Brownell, Karen Harris and Steve Graham, Rob Horner, Kathleen Lane, Naomi Zigmond, Ann Turnbull and Nancy Jordan.

 

To submit a nomination/self-nomination for this award, email a copy of the following by September 15, 2021 to chair of this award: 
  1. A letter of nomination, NO LONGER THAN 3 pages, addressing each of the following:
    • the research base(s) to which the individual or team has made substantial contributions,
    • the efforts undertaken by the individual or team to translate this research to practice, and
    • the impact of the research on policy, practice, or both.
  2. A complete and current vitae for the nominee or each team member
  3. Names, email addresses, and phone numbers of up to five references familiar with the nominee's work.

 

Dr. Jacqueline Lubin, Chair
Kauffman-Hallahan-Pullen Distinguished Researcher Award Committee 
jacyves@gmail.com 
 

Past Award Recipients

Dr. Snyder is a scholar whose work shapes and improves research, policy, and practices in early intervention and early childhood special education in the context of the broader early childhood field.  Her research focuses on (a) embedded instruction in early learning; (b) social-emotional and communication foundations for early learning; (c) applications of research designs and methods in early intervention and early childhood special education; (c) measurement and assessment in early childhood; and (d) evidence-informed professional development implementation support practices, including practice-based coaching. She and her colleagues developed a practice-based coaching model, which is used widely in early childhood, including Head Start. Dr. Snyder is a former editor of the Journal of Early Intervention. She is a member of the Pyramid Model Consortium and she chairs the Division for Early Childhood’s Recommended Practices Evidence Synthesis Group. As her nominator stated, Dr. Snyder “has addressed practical needs in real-world contexts” and her “work has raised the bar for rigor in examining the implementation of effective practices.” 

 

Awardee contact information: Patricia Snyder, University of Florida

 

Nominator: Erica McCray, University of Florida

Dr. Nancy Jordan, Dean Family Endowed Chair of Teacher Education in the School of Education at the University of Delaware, has been selected as the 2020 recipient of the Kauffman-Hallahan-Pullen Distinguished Researcher Award from the Division for Research of the Council of Exceptional Children. This award recognizes the critical importance of research in special education that has had a meaningful impact on the field. It honors individuals or research teams whose creation of a research base as well as the work done to translate the research into practice has resulted in more effective services or education for exceptional individuals.

 

Dr. Jordan conducts foundational research in the learning sciences and translates those results to improve practices for students with mathematical learning difficulties and disabilities, particularly in the areas of early number sense and fractions. Her work in both content strands involves identifying predictors of growth and achievement as well as translating the research finding to develop evidence-based assessments, interventions, and instructional materials and guidelines to support struggling learners, including those from underserved, low-income communities. Her scholarship is published in high-impact academic journals as well as outlets aimed at teachers, administrators, and policymakers. Dr. Jordan also serves the field and society through her leadership roles in professional organizations, grant review panels, advisory boards, and technical advisory committees.

Dr. Ann Turnbull is the recipient of the CEC Division for Research 2019 Kauffman-Hallahan-Pullen Distinguished Researcher Award. Dr. Turnbull is a Distinguished Professor Emerita of Special Education at the University of Kansas. This award recognizes the critical importance of research in special education that has had a meaningful impact on the field. It honors individuals or research teams whose creation of a research base as well as the work done to translate the research into practice has resulted in more effective services or education for exceptional individuals.

 

As her nominators stated, “Dr. Turnbull…not only created the foundation of research about families of individuals with disabilities but also has successfully translated her research into practice and policy.” Multiple sources of evidence support that claim: an extensive publication record of 35 books and more than 280 peer-reviewed articles; over 600 presentations and workshops delivered; the co-founding of the Beach Center on Disability at the University of Kansas, an international hub of research on families of individuals with disabilities; the development of assessment measures and practices to support families; and the mentoring of the next generation of scholars seeking to improve the lives of families of individuals with disabilities through the Family Research Network of the Council for Exceptional Children. Dr. Turnbull’s work has had a profoundly positive influence on the field of special education.

Dr. Naomi Zigmond, Distinguished Professor of Special Education in the Department of Instruction and Learning at the University of Pittsburgh, has been selected as the 2018 recipient of the Kauffman-Hallahan-Pullen Distinguished Researcher Award from the Division for Research of the Council for Exceptional Children.

 

The Kauffman-Hallahan-Pullen Distinguished Researcher Award recognizes the critical importance of research in special education that has a meaningful impact on the field. It honors individuals or research teams whose creation of a research base as well as the work done to translate the research into practice has resulted in more effective services or education for exceptional individuals.

 

The multifaceted impact of Dr. Zigmond’s research and service over a more than 50-year career in special education was a major factor in her selection for the award. As her nominators stated, Dr. Zigmond asked “the tough questions that others do not know how to ask or do not want to ask” as she showed “sustained allegiance to evidence, not ideology” throughout her career. Her research investigated a wide range of topics, such as: the inclusion of students with disabilities in general education, with emphases on teachers’ instructional practices and modifications and the attitudes and perspectives of students with and without disabilities about the experience; early reading education programs; high-school dropouts; and teacher education. She fostered collaborations with and mentored many scholars in the field. Dr. Zigmond’s contributions to special education research also include a six-year tenure as Editor of the special education journal, Exceptional Children, and establishing the Pacific Coast Research Conference in 1992.

 

The Kauffman-Hallahan-Pullen Distinguished Researcher Award is funded through earnings of the Handbook of Special Education, edited by James Kauffman, Daniel Hallahan, and Paige Pullen and published by Routledge. The award, co-sponsored by Routledge Press, includes a $1,000 honorarium.

The CEC Division for Research is pleased to announce that Dr. Kathleen Lane is the 2017 recipient of the Kauffman-Hallahan-Pullen Distinguished Researcher Award.

 

Dr. Lane earned her doctoral, master’s and bachelor’s degrees at the University of California, Riverside. She has served on faculty at the University of Arizona, California State University-Los Angeles, Peabody College of Vanderbilt, and North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is currently a professor of special education at the University of Kansas where she has served since 2012.

 

Dr. Lane has been a prolific scholar in the field of special education. A review of her curriculum vitae notes 160 publications in refereed journals, primarily research-based. She is the author of 8 books, 31 chapters, and an additional 25 other publications. Her research has yielded external support approximating $10 million.

 

A significant focus of Dr. Lane’s research has been on students with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD).  This scholarly work has consistently demonstrated a clear research-to-practice emphasis and, consequently, she and her colleagues have worked extensively with school, district and state educational programs. A major emphasis has been on the development, and validation, of comprehensive, integrated, three-tiered (Ci3T) models of prevention that enable schools to prevent the development of learning and behavior problems for students with, and at risk, for EBD and also to remediate the effects of existing challenges that students experience. Her research has been designed to increase learning and understanding of evidence-based prevention practices. In a related vein, Dr. Lane has been engaged in consistent efforts to validate preventive strategies, interventions for students at risk for difficulties, and school-wide program interventions.

 

Kathleen Lane has also conducted numerous validations of screening tools to provide assistance to educators in the evidence-based selection of such tools. This work includes examination of their social validity and practices with attention to needed professional learning and sustainability. Related work on functional assessment-based interventions has been extensive.

 

Dr. Lane also has studied students with EBD in terms of learning difficulties and instructional strategies. Her work has made major contributions in the too-often overlooked area of academic interventions and outcomes for these students.  Numerous studies have provided insight into reading/literacy instruction as well as writing, the latter (in conjunction with Karen Harris and Steve Graham) examining the implementation of Self-Regulated Strategy Development for writing and its impact on students at risk for EBD.  Dr. Lane is most deserving of recognition as the recipient of the 2017 Kauffman-Hallahan-Pullen Distinguished Researcher Award of the Division for Research of the Council for Exceptional Children.

 

Kathleen Lane

Professor of Special Education

School of Education

University of Kansas

kathleen.lane@ku.edu

The Division for Research is pleased to announce that Dr. Robert Horner is the 2016 recipient of the Kauffman-Hallahan Distinguished Researcher Award. This award recognizes individuals or research teams who have made outstanding scientific contributions in basic or applied research in special education over the course of their careers.  The award, co-sponsored by Routledge, a leading academic publisher, includes $1,000 to be presented at the CEC-DR Reception and Awards Ceremony at the 2016 CEC Convention and Expo and an invited presentation at the 2017 CEC Convention and Expo. Dr. Horner earned his doctorate from the University of Oregon in special education after previously completing his bachelor’s at Stanford University and master’s from Washington State University. He has served on the faculty of the University of Oregon since 1978, where he is currently is an Alumni-Knight endowed professor of special education and also directs the Educational and Community Supports research unit.

 

Dr. Horner has a long and influential career in research in special education, applied behavior analysis, and related fields. His vita includes over 200 peer-reviewed scholarly articles and over 100 books, book chapters, and reports. Dr. Horner has been a leader in the development, research, and implementation of positive behavior intervention and support (PBIS). His experimental, systems-level, and translational research has helped advance the field in a scientifically rigorous and practical manner. As Co-director of the Technical Assistance Center on PBIS, he leads a multi-state team that has provided support to over 21,000 schools in 50 states and also in multiple international settings.

 

Dr. Horner has published a series of seminal articles to develop stringent standards for single-case research, a technical manual for reviewers to include single-case research in Institute of Education Sciences (IES) What Works Clearinghouse reviews of evidence-based practices and a series of IES grants to deliver trainings in research methodology for researchers, grant reviewers, and funders. His efforts have resulted in increased credibility of this important research methodology.

 

As Kent McIntosh and Brigid Flannery noted, “His enduring commitment to providing practitioners with research-validated materials and tools, as well as technical assistance that focuses on building local capacity is a true model for those who wish to make an impact on the field of special education. Dr. Horner’s research has shown sensitivity not only to whether interventions work but also to how and under what conditions they work. In this process, he has built problem-solving models to enhance data-based decision making in schools and team-based approaches that can be adapted to a wide range of special education practices”.

 

Robert Horner

Alumni-Knight Professor

Special Education and Clinical Sciences

College of Education

University of Oregon

robh@uoregon.edu

Last Updated:  3 February, 2021

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